National Debt

25th Anniversary Reception: Learning Fiscal Lessons

Sep. 19, 2017, 5:30pm-7:00pm
Concord Staff:
Address:
The Coach House Restaurant (Sargent Room) at the New London Inn
353 Main Street, New London, NH 03257
Free; RSVP required

Budget Chaos in Context: Fiscal Lessons Learned for a Challenging Future

State Representative Dan Wolf and attorney Brad Cook invite you to a cocktail reception with The Concord Coalition as it marks its 25th anniversary by looking at fiscal lessons learned the past quarter-century and how those lessons apply to the major policy challenges of the next 25 years.

While the political and economic landscapes have changed, one thing remains the same: our fiscal trajectory is unsustainable.

Concord’s Executive Director, Robert Bixby, and New England Regional Director, Chase Hagaman, will discuss current and future fiscal trends and challenges and share what Concord has been doing in New Hampshire in its push to engage citizens on these vital issues.

Whether you know Concord well, or are unfamiliar with its efforts, this reception will update you on the organization’s work and the need for a more productive fiscal policy conversation at the national level.

Concord was co-founded by former U.S. Senator for New Hampshire, Warren B. Rudman.

What: Budget Chaos in Context: Fiscal Lessons Learned for a Challenging Future

When: Tuesday, September 19

5:30 p.m., Reception & Registration; 6:15 - 7:00 p.m., Program

Where: The Coach House Restaurant (Sargent Room) at the New London Inn

353 Main Street, New London, NH 03257

Watch Event

Celebrating our 25th Anniversary in Concord, MA: Fiscal Lessons for the Future

Sep. 25, 2017, 12:00pm-1:30pm
Address:
The Colonial Inn
48 Monument Square, Concord, MA 01742
Free; RSVP required

Budget Chaos in Context: Fiscal Lessons Learned for a Challenging Future

Join The Concord Coalition as we mark our 25th anniversary by looking at fiscal lessons learned the past quarter-century and how those lessons apply to the major policy challenges of the next 25 years. While the political and economic landscapes have changed, one thing remains the same: our fiscal trajectory is unsustainable.

Featuring:

  • Congresswoman Niki Tsongas is the United States representative for the third district of Massachusetts, a seat she has held since 2007 and the same seat held three decades earlier by her late husband, Paul Tsongas. Paul was also a senator, presidential candidate and co-founder of The Concord Coalition.  

  • Doug Elmendorf is an economist, dean and Don K. Price professor of public policy at Harvard Kennedy School and was the director of the Congressional Budget Office from 2009 to 2015.

  • Scot Lehigh is a columnist for the Boston Globe, was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in national reporting for his coverage of the 1988 presidential campaign and has covered state and national politics since 1985. Scot will moderate a panel taking place during the event.

  • Robert Bixby is executive director of The Concord Coalition, a nonpartisan grassroots organization that advocates for generationally responsible fiscal policy.

 

What: Budget Chaos in Context: Fiscal Lessons Learned for a Challenging Future

When: Monday, September 25 12:00 p.m., Lunch & Registration; 12:30 - 1:30 p.m., Program

Where: The Colonial Inn, 48 Monument Square, Concord, MA 01742

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Cong Tsongas
Panel Discussion
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