Our Staff

Josh Gordon Headshot
Joshua Gordon
Policy Director

Joshua B. Gordon is the Policy Director of The Concord Coalition, a nonpartisan, grassroots organization dedicated to educating the public about federal budget issues and their consequences for the future. The Concord Coalition was founded in 1992 by the late U.S. Senators Warren Rudman (R-NH) and Paul Tsongas (D-MA), and former Secretary of Commerce Peter G. Peterson.

Mr. Gordon directs The Concord Coalition's research on the federal budget, health care policy and tax policy and is the editor of Concord's blog. He frequently discusses Concord’s positions in public speeches and interviews with the media. He also directs Concord’s classroom curriculum and its budget simulations, and was a research advisor for the Sundance Film Festival Documentary I.O.U.S.A. He has been with Concord since 2001.

Mr. Gordon has a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Florida and wrote his dissertation on the budget process and the House Appropriations Committee. He also has a Master’s degree from the University of Florida and taught classes there on American Politics and on Congress. He recently served as an Adjunct Professor for the George Washington University Graduate School of Political Management. He received his Bachelor’s degree from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.

Recent Publications

The Current Health Care Policy Approach Has Fiscal Risks
June 27, 2017
With the release of the Senate health care proposal and its analysis by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), it’s clear that the House and Senate are taking the same approach on health care policy. According to CBO, the Senate bill would decrease spending by $1,022 billion and decrease revenue by $701 billion, leading to a total deficit reduction of $321 billion over the 10-year budget window from 2017 to 2026. The House bill was scored as reducing the deficit by $119 billion.
The New Score of the AHCA
May 25, 2017
The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has released its cost estimate for the American Health Care Act (AHCA) as passed in the House of Representatives on May 4. The estimate is that relative to current law the bill will decrease spending by $1,111.1 billion and decrease revenue by $992.4 billion, leading to a total deficit reduction of $118.7 billion over the 10-year budget window from 2017 to 2026. This is lower than the preliminary deficit reduction estimate of $336.5 billion from prior to last-minute amendments and the House vote.
The Country Won't be Able to 'Move On' From Health Care Reform
March 28, 2017
Despite the inclination to do so, policymakers will not be able to quickly move on from health care after last week’s defeat of the House Republican health care plan. There are immediate steps that the Trump administration needs to take to avoid costly problems in some Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplaces.