Our Staff

Josh Gordon Headshot
Joshua Gordon
Policy Director

Joshua B. Gordon is the Policy Director of The Concord Coalition, a nonpartisan, grassroots organization dedicated to educating the public about federal budget issues and their consequences for the future. The Concord Coalition was founded in 1992 by the late U.S. Senators Warren Rudman (R-NH) and Paul Tsongas (D-MA), and former Secretary of Commerce Peter G. Peterson.

Mr. Gordon directs The Concord Coalition's research on the federal budget, health care policy and tax policy and is the editor of Concord's blog. He frequently discusses Concord’s positions in public speeches and interviews with the media. He also directs Concord’s classroom curriculum and its budget simulations, and was a research advisor for the Sundance Film Festival Documentary I.O.U.S.A. He has been with Concord since 2001.

Mr. Gordon has a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Florida and wrote his dissertation on the budget process and the House Appropriations Committee. He also has a Master’s degree from the University of Florida and taught classes there on American Politics and on Congress. He recently served as an Adjunct Professor for the George Washington University Graduate School of Political Management. He received his Bachelor’s degree from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.

Recent Publications

Climbing Out of the Hole Will be Difficult
September 04, 2018
A few weeks ago, we discussed a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report that showed its standard projections, which assume current laws remain in place, likely understate the projected path of debt and that if Congress continues certain recent policies, the path gets much worse, bringing key economic outcomes down with it.
Fiscal Picture Likely Worse
August 13, 2018
The federal budget is currently on an unsustainable path, and that path has been made worse by recent congressional action. Yet a new Congressional Budget Office (CBO) analysis shows that its standard projections, which assume current laws remain in place, likely understate the projected path of debt. If Congress continues certain recent policies, the path gets much worse, bringing key economic outcomes down with it.
What the Government Spends on Health Care
June 01, 2018
The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) recently released an update to its estimates and projections of the cost and use of federal government subsidies for health insurance for people under age 65. The headline number is that the government will spend $685 billion in 2018 on such subsidies, helping 89 percent of the 273 million people under age 65 in the United States get health insurance.