Analysis & Indicators

Blog Post

Effective IRS Actions Can Help Cut Deficit

August 17, 2017

During budget negotiations in the coming weeks, Congress should ensure that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has sufficient funding to effectively enforce the tax laws and improve taxpayer assist

Policy Memo

Swift Bipartisan Action Needed on Health Care

August 01, 2017
With the Senate’s failure to pass health care legislation in last week’s votes, Congress should turn to a bipartisan approach. This is needed both to fix the serious, short-term problems with health care marketplaces around the country and to propel health care cost-control initiatives over the longer term.
In the News

A Q&A on Trump's tax plan. Brace yourself

August 23, 2017
New Jersey Star-Ledger
Topics
Fiscal Responsibility
National Debt
Tax Policy

If you are looking for straight talk on the country's fiscal crisis, the best place to find it is at bipartisan think-tanks, where experts are willing to face the daunting math, and challenge the p

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Blog Post

Signs of Fiscal Life on Capitol Hill

August 02, 2016

In the midst of a “bleak” time for the nation’s long-term finances, Phil LaRue, The Concord Coalition’s director of government relations, recently noted three small signs of fiscal life in Washington.

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) and the Social Security and Medicare trustees continue to point out the dangerous consequences of continued failure to put federal finances on a sustainable path. But some lawmakers and candidates are promising large new tax cuts or benefit increases without considering their costs, LaRue writes in a blog post.

Blog Post

Three Signs of Fiscal Life in Washington

July 21, 2016

The overall budget picture in Washington remains bleak as lawmakers have left town without making any meaningful progress on the appropriations process. They are now anticipating a September scramble to approve a Continuing Resolution (CR) to keep the government open after the new fiscal year begins Oct. 1. This means Congress, yet again, would be falling back on legislation that indiscriminately maintains the funding levels of the previous year, with little or no attention to the necessity of increased or decreased funding levels for important programs.