November 26, 2015

Posts on federal budget

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Friday, November 6, 2015 - 10:44 AM

Rep. Scott Rigell (R-Va.) recently offered the America First Act, a bill to replace 75 percent of the sequester cuts scheduled under current law with a mix of reforms in mandatory spending and revenue increases from limiting tax expenditures.

In the aftermath of the bipartisan budget agreement, ideas like those in the Rigell plan could serve as models for long-term, bipartisan fiscal reform efforts in Congress.

The Rigell plan proposes a new framework that would achieve substantial deficit reduction while replacing the sequestration-level spending caps that are in place under current law. The plan comes at a time when a number of fiscal experts and lawmakers have concluded that the sequester caps are unrealistically tight.  

According to Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates, the Rigell bill would save $2.5 trillion over the 10-year budget window. It would do so by implementing a three-to-one mix of spending cuts to revenue increases, making major reforms to Social Security and Medicare to improve their long-term finances.

On the...

Thursday, August 27, 2015 - 10:00 AM

It has been easy for advocates of generationally responsible tax and spending policies to look at Capitol Hill with dismay for the past few years. A few consequences of inaction and lack of bipartisanship include:

  • A complete breakdown in the federal budget process.

  • Continued struggles to replace arbitrary, shortsighted caps on discretionary spending with smarter deficit reduction.

  • Total inaction on addressing the main drivers of deficits in the coming years, rising health costs and an aging population.

  • More than 30 short-term extensions of transportation funding and a failure to eliminate the growing shortfall plaguing the Highway Trust Fund.

  • Multiple debt-limit showdowns, each of which threatened the United States’ credit rating and roiled financial markets.

Yet in the past few months, I’ve been pleased to see at least a few positive signs.

In over two dozen staff and member meetings conducted over the first two months of my tenure at Concord, we’ve found that some lawmakers are coming back around to the fiscal realities facing them this fall and in the coming years. Part of the...

Monday, July 13, 2015 - 7:17 AM

In a good example of history repeating itself, Congress for the second year in a row is going down to the wire on a mid-summer deadline to replenish the Highway Trust Fund before it runs out of money.

If lawmakers can’t find a solution by July 31, states will not receive promised funding from the federal government to help pay for transportation projects, bringing many such projects around the country to an abrupt halt.

Proposals released last week rely on a flawed plan to temporarily replenish the trust fund. One of those proposals, however, does identify an alternative way to fund transportation spending that could be a long-term solution.

Lawmakers also have to reauthorize highway and transit programs after passing a two-month extension of them in late May. The short-term patch ensured that state governments could continue to be reimbursed for infrastructure projects during peak construction season, but lawmakers delayed action on needed reforms to transportation financing.

And make no mistake, the trust...

Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 12:15 PM

In less than three months, the highway bill enacted last July will expire and the program’s trust fund will face imminent depletion. At that point, Congressional failure to act would cause tens of thousands of infrastructure projects to be put on hold and would jeopardize construction jobs across the country.

The highway trust fund has historically operated on a “user pays” principle, where motor vehicle and fuel taxes paid by those who directly benefit from roads fund programs to maintain and improve the system. However, when Congress last raised the federal gas tax in 1993, lawmakers chose not to index it to inflation. As a result, the gap between revenue and expenditures has grown as the real value of the tax has declined.

As the chart above shows, there would be no shortfall in the highway trust fund today had its dedicated revenue source been allowed to grow with inflation. But instead of rectifying this problem or finding an alternative source of dedicated revenue, Congress has largely relied on fiscally irresponsible patches funded by...

Tuesday, March 3, 2015 - 9:58 AM

A hearing by the House Ways and Means Social Security subcommittee last week drew attention to the impending insolvency of the Disability Insurance (DI) trust fund in 2016. While there were some disagreements, there was also a clear bipartisan consensus that something must be done to shore up the finances of Social Security.

The hearing featured testimony from Charles Blahous, a public trustee for Social Security, Ed Lorenzen of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, and Webster Phillips from the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare.

All three agreed that, given the limited time between now and the exhaustion of the DI trust fund, it would be impossible to avoid a draconian cut in disability benefits without reallocating some of the payroll tax from OASI (the retirement program) to DI. Congress last reallocated the payroll tax in 1994.

However, both Blahous and Lorenzen strongly advocated that...

Friday, November 7, 2014 - 12:55 PM

Last Wednesday, President Obama requested approximately $6.2 billion to combat the Ebola epidemic. As Congress examines and debates this proposal, it is an important opportunity to reexamine our government’s budgetary policies.

Whether it’s Ebola, ISIS, or the child migrant crisis, our nation faced a number of unforeseen challenges this year that required action (and emergency spending) by the federal government. These challenges serve as reminders of a key underlying purpose of fiscal responsibility: To enable the country to deal with the unexpected.

We can’t predict the future. But having lower debt and deficits can give us the fiscal flexibility to act quickly when crises arise. Alternatively, irresponsible budget policies leave the government with higher borrowing costs and fewer resources to deal with changing circumstances.

Furthermore, responsible budgeting isn’t just about keeping spending in line with revenue. It’s about making sure our tax and spending policies reflect our priorities as a nation.

If federal investment in hospital and emergency preparedness is important to us, for example, we must be...

Monday, October 27, 2014 - 9:36 AM

An interesting poll this month in the Des Moines Register shows that Democrats and Republicans have very different opinions on the relative importance of the federal deficit versus unemployment and jobs as campaign issues. It might be, however, that the two sides just have different ways of expressing concern over the same issue: our nation’s economic future.

Almost one-quarter of Republicans in the poll of likely Iowa caucus-goers ranked the deficit as the top issue (23 percent). Only 11 percent of Republicans ranked unemployment/jobs as the top issue.

On the Democratic side, the numbers were nearly the reverse with 21 percent of likely caucus-goers ranking jobs as their top priority and 9 percent ranking the deficit first.

Taken together, roughly one-third of likely caucus-goers in both parties ranked these two issues at the top. 

The Register poll, though limited to Iowans, suggests that there could be a path to consensus if Democrats and Republicans reject the premise that concern about the deficit implies indifference to unemployment and jobs, and vice versa.

It is possible, and indeed it is perfectly...

Friday, October 17, 2014 - 8:02 AM

The administration trecently confirmed a bit of good news about the last fiscal year: the government borrowed substantially less than it did the year before.

But this drop, in line with a previous projection by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), is no reason for complacency. The additional borrowing has still pushed the federal debt to well over $17.8 trillion, and the government remains on track to boost that by $7.2 trillion or more in the coming decade.

The final budget figures for Fiscal 2014, which ended Sept. 30, show the deficit at $483 billion, according to a joint statement by Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew and Office of Management and Budget Director Shaun Donovan. That figure compares to a $680 billion deficit in Fiscal 2013.

Lew and Donovan attribute the difference to higher government receipts and stable outlays. Receipts rose to 17.5 percent of GDP, up from 16.7 percent in 2013. Spending, while higher in absolute dollar terms, fell to 20.3 percent of GDP in Fiscal 2014. That is down from 20.8 percent the previous year.

The joint statement says spending “was lower than the previous year for many agencies and programs,” including the...

Tuesday, October 7, 2014 - 9:11 AM

On a recent day in Florida, hundreds of people gathered to examine federal budget issues, question former members of Congress and push for sustainable fiscal policy. For me, that sparked hope for our nation’s future, even in the face of mounting federal debt and changing demographics.  

The Concord Coalition and Fix the Debt partnered with two universities and eight former congressmen on Sept. 23 to present the programs and to help give members of the Millennial generation a larger voice on fiscal issues.

About 200 people -- mostly high school students -- attended a  program during the day that was part of the Lou Frey Institute’s fall symposium at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. That evening about 50 people attended a fiscal forum on the University of South Florida’s Tampa campus.

The Orlando program featured a panel that included Reverend John Allen Newman and former U.S. House members Bill Zeliff, Jason Altmire, Allen Boyd, Cliff Stearns and Tom Tauke.

“No political issue is more critical than the federal debt and deficit,” Altmire said. Boyd echoed that sentiment, saying today’s fiscal issues will determine what kind of America we and the next generation will live in.

Added Tauke: “The longer we wait to...

Tuesday, August 26, 2014 - 10:05 AM

Our nation’s reliance on a 24-hour news cycle has bred an environment focused on quick stories with tag lines to keep us engaged. Listening to a recent panel discussion, I realized that the emphasis on sound bites needs to change if we are to have any hope of improving the nation’s fiscal footing. Enacting sustainable fiscal policy will take far more than a superficial exchange of partisan one-liners.

The panel discussion, which took place earlier this month at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, focused on the federal budget, the national debt and the political roadblocks to fiscal reform. The panelists were Robert Bixby, executive director of The Concord Coalition; Richard Swett, a former ambassador to Denmark who also served in Congress, and Charles Arlinghaus, president of The Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy.

The event was co-sponsored by Concord, the Bartlett Center, the Campaign to Fix the Debt, the Millennial Action Coalition and the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy.

Arlinghaus said that fiscal issues are “difficult to deal with, and do not easily fit in a 10-second sound bite.” He noted that human nature itself is an obstacle to fiscal reform because people will need to give up something they currently have. Politicians are reluctant to press difficult changes on the...