April 27, 2017

jgordon's blog

Fiscal Risks of House Republicans' Health Plan

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) analysis of the American Health Care Act (AHCA) estimates that relative to current law the House Republican health care plan will decrease spending by $1,219.1 billion and decrease revenue by $882.8 billion, leading to a total deficit reduction of $336.5 over the 10-year budget window from 2017 to 2026.

While it is important to consider the projected loss of health insurance for 24 million people, this post will look at the numerous fiscal risks of the legislation.

New Report on Health Care Costs Should Provide Focus for Secretary Price

In the release of their annual projections for National Health Expenditures (NHE), the federal government's chief health care actuaries see the sector growing to represent one-fifth of the entire economy by 2025 (up from 18 percent in 2016). Understanding this growth and how to moderate it should be front-and-center for newly confirmed Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price.

ACA 'Repeal and Delay' Could Prove Fiscally Problematic

Republican efforts to repeal Obamacare while imposing a delay on replacement plans could prove to be fiscally problematic.

Health Care Spending Grew Faster than the Economy in 2015

National health expenditures grew by 5.8 percent in 2015, pushing health care spending to 17.8 percent of the economy, up from 17.4 percent in 2014. This marks the second year in a row spending has grown more quickly than the economy, following a stable period from 2009 to 2013. 

You Can't Just Keep the 'Good Parts'

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) dramatically altered the individual insurance market by forcing insurers to insure anyone regardless of health status or pre-existing conditions. It also eliminated caps on coverage. 

These changes have been popular. When elected officials say they support banning insurance companies from discriminating against individuals with pre-existing conditions, they are supporting this part of the ACA. One of what many people consider the “good parts” of the legislation.

Penny Plan Is Not a 'Plan,' It’s a Dodge

The penny plan to reduce spending by one cent on every dollar (one percent a year) has been bouncing around Washington for years but is now getting a higher profile with versions supported by the Senate Budget Committee Chairman Mike Enzi and the Republican nominee for president, Donald Trump. 

Lawmakers Forget Incentives Matter on Prescription Drugs

Health care cost-control efforts in the United States can often be described simply as “changing incentives.” The focus on incentives can be traced to two main circumstances:

1) The majority of politicians have opposed efforts to reduce costs simply through government price-setting, a mechanism widely used around the world to control costs.

We Can’t Turn Back on Obamacare’s Turning Point

There has recently been a renewed focus on a key provision in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) -- the so-called “Cadillac tax.” The tax, which will take effect in 2018, attempts to limit the tax-free treatment of employer-provided health insurance benefits by taxing them above a certain amount.

The Hypocritical Opposition to Funding Medicare Payment Reform

Last week the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) proposed a new method of paying for health care services, using its authority under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to scale up payment reforms that have been shown to save money while maintaining the quality of care.

Veterans Health Care Bill Moves in Wrong Direction

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) cost estimate for the Senate’s expansion of veterans’ health care has been getting a lot of attention from budget groups and members of Congress.